Illegal immigration arrests open possibilties for PCF

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CoreCivic’s Prairie Correctional Facility in Appleton is putting itself in line to get illegal immigrants arrested by ICE and being held for deportation. Photo by Leslie Ehrenberg.

Editor’s note: Some of the information for this story is from a story written by Associated Press reporter Adam Geller.

With the Trump Administration’s crackdown on illegal immigration, there is a growing demand for prison space around the country including the Upper Midwest.

It has given renewed hope for those who are pushing for the reopening of the Prairie Correctional Facility in Appleton that it could once again become an economic boost to the area’s economy.

At one time, the 1,640-bed Prairie Correctional Facility (PCF) employed 350 people from 24 surrounding counties and generated an estimated $15.2 million in economic vitality for the region. However, owner CoreCivic closed the facility in February 2010. Though it has sat empty, the private prison company has kept a minimal maintenance staff in place and invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in its upkeep.

Through the 2017 and 2018 sessions of the Minnesota Legislature, the City of Appleton and Swift County worked with District 17A Rep. Tim Miller, R-Prinsburg, and District 17 Sen. Andrew Lang, R-Olivia, to get the state to commit to using the prison. However, their efforts so far have been blocked.

With the crackdown on immigrants and the need for new prison space, CoreCivic has offered up to 600 beds at its Appleton facility to the federal Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) agency. ICE is looking for between 200 and 600 beds....

 

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Pictured: CoreCivic’s Prairie Correctional Facility in Appleton is putting itself in line to get illegal immigrants arrested by ICE and being held for deportation. Photo by Leslie Ehrenberg.

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